Main content

Building Services Engineering apprentice

The structure of our programme is part of what makes it so interesting. In terms of the practical work element, it’s probably split about 50:50 between desk work and going out onto overseas sites for things like feasibility studies. You’re designing; creating drawings, schematics and specifications; and you’re also spending time on the ground in-country.

At the same time, you’re also studying too. By your third year, that means you can be balancing university modules, and meanwhile you’re also booking your time onto projects where you’re working alongside chartered engineers on multimillion-pound pieces of work.

One of the great things about doing this apprenticeship though is how supportive everyone is here

One of the great things about doing this apprenticeship though is how supportive everyone is here. We’re studying towards a degree, and that’s a lot of work, so if I’m feeling a bit worried, or a bit pressured about an exam coming up, my team are happy for me to just sit at my desk and crack on with some revision. You have to do some work in your own time, obviously, but people will help you in the office too.

Engineers are always happy for me to ask them questions too. If I’ve got a university problem I’m stuck with, I can just ask, ‘How would you do this?’, and someone will tell me their method. It’s a good environment to learn in. Even though people are travelling regularly, there’s always someone you can go to as a sounding board, to see if your ideas are plausible.

Engineers are always happy for me to ask them questions. If I’ve got a university problem I’m stuck with, I can just ask.

You get great perspective through your course work as well. You’re studying with people in other roles in other organisations, so you all have different knowledge and different project experience to share. It means a richer experience for all of us.